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Muzzled on Twitter, Trump rails against the platform the old fashioned way

President Trump railed against Twitter Friday night, blasting the social media giant for “banning free speech” and hinting that he “will have a big announcement soon” in which he’ll designate some other platform to carry his messages.

“We will not be SILENCED!” he said — resorting to an old-fashioned press release to get the statement out.

“Twitter is not about FREE SPEECH,” he wrote.

“They are all about promoting a Radical Left Platform where some of the most vicious people in the world are allowed to speak freely.”

Trump had to release the statement directly to reporters covering the White House.

Earlier Friday, Twitter banned his civilian, @RealDonaldTrump account entirely.

And when he tried to issue Friday night’s statement on his government @POTUS account, Twitter censored it, while leaving the account online.

Muzzled on one account and censored on the other, Trump’s statement lasted about the length of three of his formerly beloved tweets:
“As I have been saying for a long time, Twitter has gone further and further in banning free speech, and tonight, Twitter employees have coordinated with the Democrats and the Radical Left in removing my account from their platform, to silence me — and YOU, the 75,000,000 great patriots who voted for me. Twitter may be a private company, but without the government’s gift of Section 230 they would not exist for long.

“I predicted this would happen. We have been negotiating with various other sites, and will have a big announcement soon, while we also look at the possibilities of building out our own platform in the near future. We will not be SILENCED!

“Twitter is not about FREE SPEECH. They are all about promoting a Radical Left platform where some of the most vicious people in the world are allowed to speak freely.

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Democratic congressman says US justice system — which 'feasts on black folks' — should treat Trump, Republican lawmakers like 'negroes'

Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) said he believes that President Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers supporting his bid to dispute the results of the 2020 presidential election should be treated like "negroes" have been treated by the criminal justice system in the United States.
Those lawmakers, according to Johnson, include Republican Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas) and Josh Hawley (Mo).

He also said that the Democratic Party ought not turn the other cheek to the perceived misdeeds of President Donald Trump and the Republican Party at large.

What is he talking about?
According to a Tuesday report from Mediaite, Johnson made the inflammatory race-related remarks Monday on SiriusXM's "The Dean Obeidallah Show."

Obeidallah told Johnson that he believed it would be "detrimental to our party" that for the sake of unity, the Biden administration simply said, "'Trump did some bad things, but look forward.'"

"It would be so destructive to our party if that is the way we go," he added.
Johnson responded, "You can't let this behavior slide, you can't ignore it and hope that it's not going to happen again. You see what's shaping up for the future with guys like Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz who are looking to turn the Trump Republican Party into the Trump Republican Party on steroids."

The Georgia Democrat added that conservative Republican lawmakers will be certain to quickly learn that they "will not be allowed to get away with what Donald Trump did."

"We have got to make sure that those who come after Donald Trump know that they will not be allowed to get away with what Donald Trump did, that they will be held accountable," he insisted. "They will be treated, yes, like 'negroes' — they will be perp-walked to the jail, handcuffed not in front of them, but behind them. They will be booked, fingerprinted, have to make bond, and have to hire a lawyer just like everyone else and go through the system."

Johnson explained that the U.S. justice system "feasts on black folks."

"[F]or once it needs to turn its attention to what this man has done to turn our country into something that we just don't need to let it get to," he explained. "He can't be allowed to get away with it because if we allow him to get away with it, there will be others who will try to do the same thing, and we don't even want them to think about doing what Trump has done."

What's a brief history on his remarks?
Johnson's remarks come on the heels of introducing a resolution to censure Trump over his call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger.

The president in recent days has come under fire for a recently published phone call with Raffensperger.

In a reported hourlong phone call, Trump appeared to repeatedly urge the Georgia secretary of state to "find" enough votes to help reverse the state's election results.

In the measure, Johnson has called on Trump to "retract and disavow this unlawful and unconstitutional behavior" and to recognize President-elect Joe Biden as winner of the 2020 presidential election.

"President Trump's actions and statements on this call demonstrate an attempt to willfully deprive the citizens of Georgia of a fair and impartial election process in direct contravention of both federal law and the laws of the state of Georgia," Johnson's resolution added.

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Nashville Christmas bomber showed interest in 'lizard people' conspiracy theories, sources say


NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Sources familiar with the Nashville bomb investigation told ABC News that authorities are looking into evidence that Anthony Quinn Warner was interested in various conspiracy theories, including some involving "lizard people."

The lizard or reptilian conspiracy theory involves a belief that shape-shifting reptilian creatures appear in human form and are bent on world domination.

Warner, authorities believe, also spent time hunting for alien life forms in a nearby state park.

It is unclear if any of these beliefs or behaviors are connected in any way to the bombing.

This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.

In the days before he detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville on Christmas, Anthony Quinn Warner changed his life in ways that suggest he never intended to survive the blast that killed him and wounded three other people.

Warner, 63, gave away his car, telling the recipient that he had cancer. A month before the bombing, he signed a document that transferred his longtime home in a Nashville suburb to a California woman for nothing in return. The computer consultant told an employer that he was retiring.

But he didn't leave behind a clear digital footprint or any other obvious clues to explain why he set off the explosion in his parked recreational vehicle or played a message warning people to flee before it damaged dozens of buildings and knocked out cellphone service in the area.

While investigators tried to piece together a possible motive for the attack, a neighbor recalled a recent conversation with Warner that seemed ominous only in hindsight.

Rick Laude told The Associated Press on Monday that he saw Warner standing at his mailbox less than a week before Christmas and pulled over in his car to talk. After asking how Warner's elderly mother was doing, Laude said he casually asked him, "Is Santa going to bring you anything good for Christmas?"

Warner smiled and said, "Oh, yeah, Nashville and the world is never going to forget me," Laude recalled.

Laude said he didn't think much of the remark and thought Warner only meant that "something good" was going to happen for him financially. He was speechless when he learned that authorities had identified Warner as the bomber.

"Nothing about this guy raised any red flags," Laude said.
As investigators continued to search for a motive, body camera video released late Monday by Nashville police offered more insight into the moments leading up to the explosion and its aftermath.

The recording from Officer Michael Sipos' camera captures officers walking past the RV parked across the street as the recorded warning blares and then helping people evacuate after the thunderous blast off camera. Car alarms and sirens wail as a police dispatch voice calls for all available personnel and people stumble through downtown streets littered with glass.

David Rausch, the director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, said authorities hope to establish a motive but sometimes simply cannot.

"The best way to find motive is to talk to the individual. We will not be able to do that in this case," Rausch said Monday in an interview on NBC's "Today" show.

Investigators are analyzing Warner's belongings collected during the investigation, including a computer and a portable storage drive, and continue to interview witnesses as they try to identify a potential motive, a law enforcement official said. A review of his financial transactions also uncovered purchases of potential bomb-making components, the official said.
Warner had recently given away a vehicle and told the person he gave it to that he had been diagnosed with cancer, though it is unclear whether he indeed had cancer, the official said. Investigators used some items collected from the vehicle, including a hat and gloves, to match Warner's DNA, and DNA was taken from one of his family members, the official said.

The official could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity.

Warner also apparently gave away his home in Antioch, Tennessee, to a Los Angeles woman a month before the bombing. A property record dated Nov. 25 indicates Warner transferred the home to the woman in exchange for no money. The woman's signature is not on that document.

Warner had worked as a computer consultant for Nashville real estate agent Steve Fridrich, who told the AP in a text message that Warner had said he was retiring earlier this month.

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Nashville Christmas bomber showed interest in 'lizard people' conspiracy theories, sources say
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Keyon Harrold and his son -- along with mother Kat Harrold and attorney Ben Crump -- speak out after they say a woman attacked the Black 14-year-old, accusing him of stealing her phone.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Sources familiar with the Nashville bomb investigation told ABC News that authorities are looking into evidence that Anthony Quinn Warner was interested in various conspiracy theories, including some involving "lizard people."

The lizard or reptilian conspiracy theory involves a belief that shape-shifting reptilian creatures appear in human form and are bent on world domination.

Warner, authorities believe, also spent time hunting for alien life forms in a nearby state park.

It is unclear if any of these beliefs or behaviors are connected in any way to the bombing.

This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.

In the days before he detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville on Christmas, Anthony Quinn Warner changed his life in ways that suggest he never intended to survive the blast that killed him and wounded three other people.

Warner, 63, gave away his car, telling the recipient that he had cancer. A month before the bombing, he signed a document that transferred his longtime home in a Nashville suburb to a California woman for nothing in return. The computer consultant told an employer that he was retiring.

But he didn't leave behind a clear digital footprint or any other obvious clues to explain why he set off the explosion in his parked recreational vehicle or played a message warning people to flee before it damaged dozens of buildings and knocked out cellphone service in the area.

WATCH: Nashville PD releases body cam footage from Christmas Day blast

In the video above, officers are seen telling people in the downtown area to "get out" moments before the explosion occurred. One officer even said the audio recording sounded like something "from a movie."

While investigators tried to piece together a possible motive for the attack, a neighbor recalled a recent conversation with Warner that seemed ominous only in hindsight.

Rick Laude told The Associated Press on Monday that he saw Warner standing at his mailbox less than a week before Christmas and pulled over in his car to talk. After asking how Warner's elderly mother was doing, Laude said he casually asked him, "Is Santa going to bring you anything good for Christmas?"

Warner smiled and said, "Oh, yeah, Nashville and the world is never going to forget me," Laude recalled.

Laude said he didn't think much of the remark and thought Warner only meant that "something good" was going to happen for him financially. He was speechless when he learned that authorities had identified Warner as the bomber.

"Nothing about this guy raised any red flags," Laude said.
Federal authorities identified on Sunday the man they say is responsible for the Christmas Day bombing and said that he died in the explosion.

As investigators continued to search for a motive, body camera video released late Monday by Nashville police offered more insight into the moments leading up to the explosion and its aftermath.

The recording from Officer Michael Sipos' camera captures officers walking past the RV parked across the street as the recorded warning blares and then helping people evacuate after the thunderous blast off camera. Car alarms and sirens wail as a police dispatch voice calls for all available personnel and people stumble through downtown streets littered with glass.

David Rausch, the director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, said authorities hope to establish a motive but sometimes simply cannot.

"The best way to find motive is to talk to the individual. We will not be able to do that in this case," Rausch said Monday in an interview on NBC's "Today" show.

Investigators are analyzing Warner's belongings collected during the investigation, including a computer and a portable storage drive, and continue to interview witnesses as they try to identify a potential motive, a law enforcement official said. A review of his financial transactions also uncovered purchases of potential bomb-making components, the official said.

WATCH: Police camera shows moment downtown Nashville bomb goes off

Metro Nashville PD traffic camera at the intersection of 2nd Ave. N & Commerce St. captured a video showing the moment the explosion occurred on Christmas Day.

Warner had recently given away a vehicle and told the person he gave it to that he had been diagnosed with cancer, though it is unclear whether he indeed had cancer, the official said. Investigators used some items collected from the vehicle, including a hat and gloves, to match Warner's DNA, and DNA was taken from one of his family members, the official said.

The official could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity.

Warner also apparently gave away his home in Antioch, Tennessee, to a Los Angeles woman a month before the bombing. A property record dated Nov. 25 indicates Warner transferred the home to the woman in exchange for no money. The woman's signature is not on that document.

Warner had worked as a computer consultant for Nashville real estate agent Steve Fridrich, who told the AP in a text message that Warner had said he was retiring earlier this month.

WATCH: Video shows the aftermath of the explosion:

Video from the scene shows the aftermath of a possible explosion in downtown Nashville on Christmas morning.

Officials said Warner had not been on their radar before Christmas. A law enforcement report released Monday showed that Warner's only arrest was for a 1978 marijuana-related charge.

"It does appear that the intent was more destruction than death, but again that's all still speculation at this point as we continue in our investigation with all our partners," Rausch said.

Officials have not provided insight into why Warner selected the particular location for the bombing, which damaged an AT&T building and wreaked havoc on cellphone service and police and hospital communications in several Southern states. By Monday, the company said the majority of services had been restored for residents and businesses.

Forensic analysts were reviewing evidence from the blast site to try to identify the components of the explosives as well as information from the U.S. Bomb Data Center for intelligence and investigative leads, according to a law enforcement official who said investigators were examining Warner's digital footprint and financial history.

The official, who was not authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity, said federal agents were examining a number of potential leads and pursuing several theories, including the possibility that the AT&T building was targeted.
The bombing took place on a holiday morning well before downtown streets were bustling with activity. Police were responding to a report of shots fired Friday when they encountered the RV blaring a recorded warning that a bomb would detonate in 15 minutes. Then, for reasons that may never be known, the audio switched to a recording of Petula Clark's 1964 hit "Downtown" shortly before the blast.

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Apparently, wishing someone 'Merry Christmas' is now 'white supremacy culture at work'

The War on Christmas continues

In our culture of progressivism and political correctness, nothing is safe.
Now, apparently, even wishing someone a "Merry Christmas" is "white supremacy culture at work." At least, that's according to Jen Bokoff, a Chicago woman who made the astonishing claim on Christmas Day.

"This is your annual reminder that not everyone celebrates Christmas! The default to 'Merry Christmas' as a normal greeting is also white supremacy culture at work. If someone celebrates, then by all means. But so many people don't," Bokoff tweeted.
Bokoff's claim is dripping with irony. That's because Christmas is one of Christianity's two major holiday seasons (the other being Easter, of course). And Christianity is, in fact, the largest global multiethnic religion, which means Christmas was celebrated on every continent and nearly every country on Friday.

Bokoff's message generated a tsunami of backlash, resulting in Bokoff "locking" her Twitter account.

One person responded, "My best friend's Muslim family, our black neighbors, my Jewish college roommate - ALL celebrate Christmas and no one gets pissed when they say 'Merry Christmas.'"
 CHRIS ENLOE
In our culture of progressivism and political correctness, nothing is safe.

Now, apparently, even wishing someone a "Merry Christmas" is "white supremacy culture at work." At least, that's according to Jen Bokoff, a Chicago woman who made the astonishing claim on Christmas Day.

"This is your annual reminder that not everyone celebrates Christmas! The default to 'Merry Christmas' as a normal greeting is also white supremacy culture at work. If someone celebrates, then by all means. But so many people don't," Bokoff tweeted.
Bokoff's claim is dripping with irony. That's because Christmas is one of Christianity's two major holiday seasons (the other being Easter, of course). And Christianity is, in fact, the largest global multiethnic religion, which means Christmas was celebrated on every continent and nearly every country on Friday.

Bokoff's message generated a tsunami of backlash, resulting in Bokoff "locking" her Twitter account.

One person responded, "My best friend's Muslim family, our black neighbors, my Jewish college roommate - ALL celebrate Christmas and no one gets pissed when they say 'Merry Christmas.'"
Another person said, "Who wants to tell her that hundreds of millions of Christians who celebrate Christmas worldwide are something other than white?"

One person pointed out, "This isn't a racist white thing. Jesus was Middle Eastern. This is a, 'I follow Christ thing' Bless her heart."

Another person said, "I was walking on the sidewalk today a Muslim lady was going the other direction, she said Merry Christmas to me. I was thrilled. I wished her Merry Christmas, we both smiled and kept walking. It was a great moment for me. The real person should give it a try and get real."

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Black Lives Matter activist Shaun King says statues of Jesus Christ should be torn down — but just the white ones

They are a gross form [of] white supremacy'

Black Lives Matter activist Shaun King said that it is permissible to tear down the statues of Jesus Christ that show him with European features because they support white supremacy.
"Yes, I think the statues of the white European they claim is Jesus should also come down. They are a form of white supremacy. Always have been," King tweeted on Monday.

Yes, I think the statues of the white European they claim is Jesus should also come down. They are a form of whit… https://t.co/VbWphTwCQv
— Shaun King (@Shaun King)1592844161.0
"In the Bible, when the family of Jesus wanted to hide, and blend in, guess where they went? EGYPT! Not Denmark. Tear them down," he added.
"Yes. All murals and stained glass windows of white Jesus, and his European mother, and their white friends should also come down," he explained in a second tweet.

"They are a gross form [of] white supremacy," he added. "Created as tools of oppression. Racist propaganda. They should all come down."

King has been besieged by accusations from former activist partners and employees that he has been accepting much more money in donations than he is willing to account for publicly. He has denied the accusations.

He also made headlines during the Democratic primary as the campaign surrogate for the presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) after he misrepresented a report by MSNBC's Rachel Maddow and she responded negatively.

PS  This is what America has come to.    The end

 

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